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ACT - Action Counters Terrorism

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The Government has launched a new initiative called ACT - Action Counters Terrorism. Information on this is outlined below.

 

A5 Leaflet.pdf

 

 

Action Counters Terrorism 2018 Campaign Pre-Launch Toolkit

 

Communities Defeat Terrorism: reporting suspicious activity & behaviour

 

Overview

 

Thank you for supporting the 2018 ACT (Action Counters Terrorism) public awareness campaign, which will launch on Tuesday 20 March and run for four weeks.

 

Communities defeat terrorism and with the enduring terrorist threat, it is now more important than ever that everyone plays their part in tackling terrorism. Individual actions could save lives.

 

That’s why the ACT campaign is encouraging the public to help the police tackle terrorism and save lives by reporting suspicious behaviour and activity at www.gov.uk/ACT. We will be raising awareness of the different attack planning methods that terrorists might use so the public knows some of the signs to spot and how to report any concerns. 

 

This campaign toolkit will provide you with the background and resources you need to help prepare to support the campaign. A second version with final assets and resources will be shared closer to the launch date. 

 

 

 

How you can help:

 

  • Adapt our news story template for your website about why you’re supporting ACT and share examples of signs to spot and how to report (p5)

 

  • Share ACT posters and graphics in your organisation’s building, display screens and public areas (p9)

 

  • Share our digital assets and creative film on your organisation’s social media accounts (p5)

 

  • Provide a supportive statement from your organisation for the ACT campaign (p2)

 

  • Use external newsletters, your website, blogs and other channels to signpost the public to advice on how to report suspicious activity or behaviour that could be terrorist related via www.gov.uk/ACT (p5 & p9)

 

  • Use staff newsletters and your intranet to signpost internal staff to advice on how to report suspicious activity or behaviour that could be terrorist related via www.gov.uk/ACT (p7)

 

 

If you have any comments or questions, please contact us on nctphq.comms@met.police.uk

 

 

 

 

Table of Contents

 

Campaign background and objectives 1

 

Targetaudiences and insight 2

 

Key messages and narrative 3

 

Campaign strategy 4

 

Digital resources 5

 

Internal communications resources 7

 

Print resources 9

 

Branding guidelines and logos 9

 

FAQs 10

 

 

About Counter Terrorism Policing

 

Counter Terrorism Policing is a collaboration of UK police forces working alongside the UK intelligence agencies to protect the public and our national infrastructure. Our officers and staff are at the frontline of the UK’s fight against terrorism, working tirelessly to prevent, disrupt and investigate extremists, whatever their ideology.

 

ACT Background

 

In March 2017, National Counter Terrorism Policing launched ACT (Action Counters Terrorism), a new branding platform which incorporates all of our counter-terrorism external campaigns to warn, inform and reassure the public.

 

Make Nothing Happen was the first national advertising campaign to be launched under ACT. Its objective of encouraging the public to trust their instincts to report anything they see or hear which may be terrorist related, was underpinned by the message that cooperation between the public and the police remains the greatest advantage in tackling the challenges the UK faces from terrorism. The campaign ran across radio and digital channels over six weeks (of paid for activity) backed by a national and regional media and PR plan.

 

Since the launch of Make Nothing Happen in March 2017, there have been five terrorist attacks in the UK resulting in a change of rhythm and tempo in police investigations. As a result, there is now less need to remind people of the terrorist threat.  Instead we must continue to find ways of educating the public about the different stages of attack planning beyond ‘the suspicious package’ while encouraging them to be part of the Counter Terrorism effort to help us stop attacks happening in the first place.  

 

Beyond this, research carried out by Mediacom in 2016 found that there are four stages to the reporting journey; not noticing suspicious behaviour or activity; noticing but unsure about reporting; intending to report and reporting. The strongest barriers to reporting relate to the first two stages, i.e. knowing what to look out for and having the confidence to report.

 

2018 ACT Campaign Objectives

 

The campaign’s objectives are:

 

  • Encourage the public to report suspicious activity or behaviour and increase intelligence from communities.
  • Increase public understanding of what activity or behaviour to look out for by highlighting examples of terrorist attack planning methods.
  • Increase awareness of key reporting channels like gov.uk/ACT.
  • Reinforce the message that communities defeat terrorism – and the key role the public have to play in helping tackle the terrorist threat.

 

Target Audiences

 

The main audiences the campaign will target are:

Audience Insight

In January 2018, Wavemaker conducted an online study with over 1,000 UK adults across the country. The pre-campaign research found:

 

  • Anxiety over terrorism in the UK is high (83%) with a third of the public saying they are very concerned.  Two-thirds say they have become more concerned over the past year, which has been fuelled by the frequency and unpredictability of attacks. 
  • 3 in 4 feel the police are doing well in keeping the public safe, believing that much work goes on behind the scenes to thwart potential attacks.
  • The vast majority would report suspicious behaviours with being ‘safe rather than sorry’ as a key motivator.
  • The motivation to report suspicious behaviour is high at 82%, with the potential to save lives being a strong driver.
  • A very small number of people would not report and their main barriers included fear of getting someone into trouble if incorrect, distrust of the police and fear of wasting police time.
  • Extreme behaviours such as an interest/use of in firearms or chemicals are easier for people to label as a high threat, but they are less certain about the behaviours that are more everyday/potentially ambiguous.
  • Online search is the first port of call to find out more information or advice on reporting suspicious activity.
  • More than 1 in 10 are aware of ACT which is good considering that it is a very new brand. However awareness is lower than other reporting methods, so raising awareness will be a key function of this campaign.
  • The reporting methods that are seen as easy to use are favoured, but this preference is subjective (i.e. preferring to speak over the phone) and subject to interpretation (i.e. some people saw reporting suspicious behaviour as an emergency (and there requiring a 999 response) whereas others did not).

 

Key Messages

 

  • Communities defeat terrorism.
  • Like other criminals, terrorists need to plan. If you see or hear something unusual or suspicious trust your instincts and ACT by reporting it in confidence at gov.uk/ACT.
  • Any piece of information could be important, it is better to be safe and report. You can help the police prevent terrorism and save lives.
  • You are not wasting our time, and we will only take action after the appropriate checks have been carried out.

 

2018 ACT Campaign Narrative

 

Communities defeat terrorism. With the enduring terrorist threat, it is now more important than ever that everyone plays their part in tackling terrorism. Your actions could save lives.

 

That’s why Action Counters Terrorism (ACT) is encouraging communities across the country to help the police tackle terrorism and save lives by reporting suspicious behaviour and activity.

 

Like other criminals, terrorists need to plan. If you see or hear something unusual or suspicious trust your instincts and ACT by reporting it in confidence at gov.uk/ACT or, in an emergency, dial 999.

 

Some examples of suspicious activity or behaviour could potentially include:

  • Hiring large HGV vehicles or similar for no obvious reasons
  • Buying or storing a large amount of chemicals, fertilisers or gas cylinders for no obvious reasons
  • Taking notes or photos of security arrangements, or inspecting CCTV cameras in an unusual way
  • Looking at extremist material, including on the so-called Dark Web, or sharing and creating content that promotes or glorifies terrorism.
  • Someone receiving deliveries for unusual items bought online.
  • Embracing or actively promoting hateful ideas or an extremist ideology.
  • Possessing firearms or other weapons or showing an interest in obtaining them
  • Holding passports or other documents in different names, for no obvious reasons
  • Anyone who goes away travelling for long periods of time but is vague about where
  • Someone carrying out suspicious or unusual bank transactions

 

You are not wasting our time, and no call or click will be ignored. What you tell us is treated in the strictest confidence and is thoroughly researched by experienced officers before, and if, any police action is taken.

 

Any piece of information could be important, it is better to be safe and report. Remember, trust your instincts and ACT. Action Counters Terrorism.

 

Campaign Strategy

 

Counter Terrorism Policing will launch the 2018 ACT campaign on 20 March 2018. This campaign will run over a four week period and will deliver an integrated communication approach to maximise message reach including:            

 

  • Paid for digital advertising:a paid for online video campaign to maximise exposure and reach (targeted at specific areas informed by operational policing) will run for four weeks. This will include a new creative film to educate the public on different attack planning methods to look out for and explain how reporting suspicious behaviour and activity can help the police tackle terrorism and keep communities safe.
  • Owned and earned channels: share engaging content with clear call to action via: the Counter Terrorism network and police forces' channels and stakeholder networks; Government and GCS local channels and stakeholder networks; and mainstream, regional, specialist and online media.
  • Media: A full media plan will be shared in due course, but will include national, regional and local activity supplemented by editorial engagement with national, BME, consumer and regional press and broadcasters.
  • Digital and social media: campaign activity across owned, borrowed and paid for channels, police force/Government/local authority and other key stakeholder websites, social media accounts and video broadcasting channels.

 

We will be seeking your help in sharing the messaging across your own channels and networks to help us maximise our reach.

 

 

Digital Resources

We will be using all of our social media channels to promote the creative film, share informational graphics and direct the public to www.gov.uk/ACT which provides a one stop shop for the online reporting tool, advice, campaign materials and links to supportive information. 

 

How can you support online?

 

  • We have provided a template news story that you can publish on your website, educating the public on where to report and what to look out for.
  • We will be providing graphics, films and suggested social media posts closer to the launch date.

The campaign’s hashtag is #ActionCountersTerrorism.

 

Our social media channels are:

 

 

Please note that the Anti-Terrorist Hotline textphone option for the deaf or hard of hearing is no longer in service. Please remove this if it is still on your website.

 

Template Website News Article

Action Counters Terrorism: Report suspicious activity and behaviour to tackle terrorism

[INSERT ORGANISATION] urges the public to help the police tackle terrorism and save lives by reporting suspicious behaviour and activity.

Communities defeat terrorism. With the enduring terrorist threat, it is now more important than ever that everyone plays their part in tackling terrorism. Your actions could save lives.

Don’t worry about wasting police time. No call or click will be ignored. What you tell the police is treated in the strictest confidence and is thoroughly researched by experienced officers before, and if, any police action is taken.

Any piece of information could be important, it is better to be safe and report. Remember, trust your instincts and ACT. Action Counters Terrorism.

How can I report?

Reporting is quick and easy. You can report in confidence online via our secure form: www.gov.uk/ACT. Alternatively, you can call the police confidentially on 0800 789 321.

All reports are kept confidential and you can report anonymously.

In an emergency always call 999.

What should I report?

Like other criminals, terrorists need to plan. You can report suspicious activity or behaviour – anything that seems out of place, unusual or just doesn’t seem to fit in with everyday life.

Some examples of suspicious activity or behaviour could potentially include:

Research

Do you know someone who looks at extremist material, including on the so-called Dark Web, or shares and creates content that promotes or glorifies terrorism?

Have you noticed someone embracing or actively promoting hateful ideas or an extremist ideology?

Meetings, training and planning can take place anywhere. Do you know someone who travels but is vague about where they’re going?

Do you know someone with passports or other documents in different names, for no obvious reason?

 

Gathering materials

Suspicious materials can be ordered online as well as in store. Have you noticed someone receiving deliveries for unusual items bought online?

If you work in commercial vehicle hire or sales, has a sale or rental seemed unusual?

Have you noticed someone buying large or unusual quantities of chemicals, fertilisers or gas cylinders for no obvious reason?

Have you noticed someone acquiring illegal firearms or other weapons or showing an interest in obtaining them?

 

Storing materials

 

Terrorists need to store equipment while preparing for an attack. Have you noticed anyone storing large amounts of chemicals, fertilisers or gas cylinders?

Have you noticed anyone storing illegal firearms or objects that could potentially be weapons?

 

Hostile Reconnaissance

Observation and surveillance help terrorists plan attacks. Have you witnessed anyone taking pictures or notes of security arrangements or CCTV?

 

Financing

Cheque and credit card fraud are ways of generating cash. Have you noticed any suspicious or unusual bank transactions?

 

If you’d like more information or resources, visit www.gov.uk/ACT or follow Counter Terrorism Policing on social media:

 

Internal communications resources

In addition to promoting the campaign to external audiences, we are also providing resources to signpost your staff to advice on how to report suspicious behaviour and activity that could be terrorist related.

How can you support?

  • We’ve provided a template article text for you to adapt for your intranet or internal staff newsletters.
  • We have also provided graphics for you to display on your building’s display screens.

Display screen graphics

Template Intranet/Newsletter text – 2018 ACT Campaign

 [Insert organisation] is proud to support Counter Terrorism Policing’s Action Counters Terrorism (ACT Campaign) to encourage the public to help the police tackle terrorism and save lives by reporting suspicious behaviour and activity.

 

Communities defeat terrorism. With the enduring terrorist threat, it is now more important than ever that everyone – including [insert organisation] staff – plays their part in tackling terrorism. Our actions could save lives.

 

Like other criminals, terrorists need to plan. If you see or hear something unusual or suspicious trust your instincts and ACT by reporting it in confidence at gov.uk/ACT. If it’s an emergency call 999.

 

Some examples of suspicious activity or behaviour could potentially include:

Research

Do you know someone who looks at extremist material, including on the so-called Dark Web, or shares and creates content that promotes or glorifies terrorism?

Have you noticed someone embracing or actively promoting hateful ideas or an extremist ideology?

Meetings, training and planning can take place anywhere. Do you know someone who travels but is vague about where they’re going?

Do you know someone with passports or other documents in different names, for no obvious reason?

 

Gathering materials

Suspicious materials can be ordered online as well as in store. Have you noticed someone receiving deliveries for unusual items bought online?

If you work in commercial vehicle hire or sales, has a sale or rental seemed unusual?

Have you noticed someone buying large or unusual quantities of chemicals, fertilisers or gas cylinders for no obvious reason?

Have you noticed someone acquiring illegal firearms or other weapons or showing an interest in obtaining them?

 

Storing materials

 

Terrorists need to store equipment while preparing for an attack. Have you noticed anyone storing large amounts of chemicals, fertilisers or gas cylinders?

Have you noticed anyone storing illegal firearms or objects that could potentially be weapons?

 

Hostile Reconnaissance

Observation and surveillance help terrorists plan attacks. Have you witnessed anyone taking pictures or notes of security arrangements or CCTV?

 

Financing

Cheque and credit card fraud are ways of generating cash. Have you noticed any suspicious or unusual bank transactions?

 

Don’t worry about wasting police time. Any piece of information could be important and it is better to be safe and report. No call or click will be ignored. What you tell the police is treated in the strictest confidence and is thoroughly researched by experienced officers before, and if, any police action is taken.

 

Remember, trust your instincts and ACT. Action Counters Terrorism.

 

 

Print Resources

You can also use the following posters and leaflets to display inside your organisation’s building. They have been provided in PDF and InDesign formats should you need to resize the image or add your organisation’s logo.

 

 

ACT logos

 

The logos below can be used for promoting the campaign.

 

 

Branding Guidelines

The guidelines below provide you with helpful information on how to use the ACT logo and branding.

 

 

FAQs

What type of behaviour or activity could be considered suspicious?

 

Some examples of suspicious behaviour or activity include:

  • Hiring large HGV vehicles or similar for no obvious reasons
  • Buying or storing a large amount of chemicals, fertilisers or gas cylinders for no obvious reasons
  • Taking notes or photos of security arrangements, or inspecting CCTV cameras in an unusual way
  • Looking at extremist material, including on the so-called Dark Web, or sharing and creating content that promotes or glorifies terrorism.
  • Someone receiving deliveries for unusual items bought online.
  • Embracing or actively promoting hateful ideas or an extremist ideology.
  • Possessing firearms or other weapons or showing an interest in obtaining them
  • Holding passports or other documents in different names, for no obvious reasons
  • Anyone who goes away travelling for long periods of time but is vague about where
  • Someone carrying out suspicious or unusual bank transactions

 

How sure do I have to be before passing on my suspicions?

 

An honest held belief that something is occurring or you have a belief someone is acting suspiciously.

 

If my information turns out to be incorrect will I have wasted police time?

 

You may feel it’s probably nothing, but unless you trust your instincts and tell us we won’t be able to judge whether the information you have is important or not.

 

Remember, no piece of information is considered too small or insignificant. Our specially trained officers and police staff would rather take lots of calls which are made in good faith, but have innocent explanations, than not getting any at all.

 

How do I report suspicious behaviour or activity?

 

You can quickly and anonymously report online via www.gov.uk/ACT or you can call the police in confidence on 0800 789 321. Remember, in an emergency you should always call 999.

 

Who will take my call or read my online report?

 

A Counter Terrorism Police Officer or a trained member of police staff will review your information within two hours.

 

Do I have to give my name or any personal details?

 

No, it is entirely up to you if you wish to leave your contact details.

 

Is it confidential?

 

Yes, reporting is confidential - you don’t have to give your details unless you wish to do so.

 

I am concerned that someone will find out I have contacted the police?

 

We understand that people might have reservations about contacting police, either because their friends or family may find out, or their suspicions may prove to have innocent explanations. But we can reassure you that all calls and information are treated in the strictest confidence.

 

What sort of detail will the police need from me?

 

If you are reporting an incident you have witnessed we will need as much detail as possible, this could include the clothing someone was wearing, their age, height, ethnicity and actions for example.

 

Will my call be traced or recorded?

 

Your call will not be recorded. If you wish to leave your details you can do so but otherwise your call will remain anonymous.

 

How long will reporting take?

 

It will depend on how much information you are able to provide when you contact us.

 

What will happen with the information?

 

Our specially trained officers and police staff who take the calls will assess and evaluate the information you pass on before deciding on what action to take.

 

Will I be given an update?

 

Unfortunately we are unable to provide updates due to data protection issues and because the information we receive is passed to us on an anonymous basis.

 

If the police need to speak to me again, how will they contact me?

 

We will only get in touch with you if we need to ask you further details about the information you have provided and we will only do this if you want to leave your contact details.

 

Will I need to give a statement?

 

In a case where you are giving information and wish to leave your contact details, you may be asked to provide a statement however this will depend on your wishes.

 

Does the hotline have a language line?

 

If you have difficulties speaking English, you can ask a friend who can speak English to contact us on your behalf. However, we will need to take into consideration the type of call and the privacy and level of information being divulged.

 

I suffer from hearing loss, how can I pass on information which I think may be important?

 

Yes, you can also contact the hotline online via www.gov.uk/ACT.

 

Can I report my suspicions over the phone rather than online?

 

Yes, if you would prefer to report information over the phone rather than online, you can call the police in confidence you on 0800 789 321.

 

Will I get a reward if I pass on information to the hotline?

 

You will not get a reward if you pass on information to the hotline.

 

If I don’t want to contact police is there anyone else I can talk to?

 

Family or trusted friends can report on your behalf but we will need to confirm the details provided with you.

 

You can also report crime or information online or via Crimestoppers anonymously on 0800 555 111

 

Always remember, if it is an emergency, call 999.

 

 

 

 

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